Books on My Fall TBR | Top Ten Tuesday

Hello and welcome back to The Inky Saga! Today I am excited to share my fall TBR. When I decided to challenge myself to blog every day this week, one of the first ideas that popped into my head was to check the theme for this week’s Top Ten Tuesday. As it turned out, this week’s topic is Books on My Fall TBR! What good fortune; I love a reason to think up a TBR.

I just moved and most of the books I with me are ones I have already read, but there are a few new books that have recently come into my life, or soon will. So this list may actually be interesting to those of you who know my reading history!

In case you are unfamiliar with this bookish meme, it’s a weekly conversation starter centered on a topic that sparks a list of ten books. As That Artsy Reader Girl puts it, “It was born of a love of lists, a love of books, and a desire to bring bookish friends together.”

 Books on My Fall TBR

Ninth House by Leigh Bardugo | My most anticipated release of the season is Leigh Bardugo’s debut adult contemporary novel. I actually bought tickets to see her in-person when she visits Austin next month! I am so excited. The ticket price includes the book, so I’ll be able to have it signed and support an independent bookstore.

The Princess Diarist by Carrie Fisher | I bought this book secondhand at 2nd and Charles this summer. I love a fun autobiography by a funny woman, and I hope this one does not disappoint. I have not read reviews, but I remember the hoopla when it came out.

All Clear by Connie Willis | A few years ago I read To Say Nothing of the Dog on John Green’s recommendation and found it highly engaging and amusing. It was one of those reads that made me wish I could read it again fresh. I’m hoping this book will provide a similar experience. I believe it is a part of that time traveling series. I would prefer to read all these books in order, but since I started To Say Nothing of the Dog I doubt it matters too much.

White Cat, Red Glove, and Black Heart by Holly Black | I feel like I read these in a frenzy when I first picked them up. This time I want to take my time. I have already started White Cat and think I will finish it by the end of the week. I’ve never been good at pacing myself with a book, but I have enjoyed reading it slow.

Strange the Dreamer by Laini Taylor | I will be most annoyed with myself if I do not finally get to this book this year. It was on my July 2018 TBR, my spring TBR. It would have been on my summer TBR if I had completed that post! It’s not that I am putting it off. I just haven’t been able to prioritize it.

Crooked Kingdom by Leigh Bardugo | It will be my second time reading this book, and I am excited to read it slowly and carefully. The last time I read it I has just moved into an apartment, so I feel weird parallels between then and now!

The Diabolic by S.J. Kincaid | This is another book on my fall TBR that has been on past TBRs. I don’t know what to say. It still intrigues me despite knowing nothing about it. I love going into a book blind.

The Tin Drum by Günter Grass | I read a novella by this author for a German literature class in 2016 called Cat and Mouse, which I really loved. It was dark and compelling, a book I could not stop thinking about. Apparently The Tin Drum is more highly acclaimed, so I have high expectations. I think I would enjoy getting lost in this tome this fall.

Me and Earl and the Dying Girl by Jesse Andrews | I may read this one really soon! I find it hard to explain why I love this book so much. Maybe I will be able to put my finger on it after a second read. I recently rewatched the movie this summer, which I highly recommend. It’s beautiful and, at times, hysterical.

End Note

It can be hard to write a TBR when you have a correlating goal of utilizing your public library, because you do not know if the books you want to read will be available. It does not help that I am a mood reader and will prioritize books based on whether a) I feel like reading them at the moment, and b) the timing seems right. Fortunately, I have become less mercurial when it comes to what I feel like reading, so I will most likely stick my fall TBR if I have the time to read as much as I would like.

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Top 5 Tuesday: Beautiful Book Spines

Welcome back to another Top 5 Tuesday here on The Inky Saga! At the beginning of each month, Shanah @ Bionic Book Worm annouces the weekly themes for this bookish meme. For this week, she asked us to share our “top five book spines.” I decided to look at my bookshelves and select the five I think are the most beautiful. Some of these books I’ve read, some I haven’t.

If you want to participate in this meme, be sure to link to Shanah’s original blog post so she gets a ping back and can add you to her post’s list of participants. It’s a fun way to discover new blogs and see what other books people listed for each topic. It’s my goal to start going through each week’s list and start blog hopping again this month.

Without further ado, here’s my top five book spines along with my rationale and the artists/designers behind the book cover art!

⟡ Six of Crows by Leigh Bardugo ⟡

My love for this book is no secret. I also am just so enamored by the original cover aesthetic for the Grishaverse books as a whole. A word that comes to mind is ornate. Six of Crows in particular is gorgeous because of the looping letters that are at once so fine and sweeping. I like how they are positioned so that the book title can be read without the need tilt the head or reorient your eyes. Also the feather details and the spiral towers at the bottom are a really nice little touch.

Jacket Art & Design: Jack Deas

⟡ Vassa in the Night by Sarah Porter ⟡

A book spine with similar characteristics to the Six of Crows, Vassa in the Night has a refined architectural detail of the castle. There’s also pretty swan that takes priority over the book spine space by placing on top of the title. It makes the spine look much more like a work of art than a book spine concerned with legibility.

Illustrations Copyright: Sarah Porter

⟡ The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender by Leslye Walton ⟡

This is one of the first books that came to mind for this list. I love the readable cursive letters distilling the long title and ultimately emphasizing Ava, the ultimate protagonist of this detailed ancestral saga. Copper feathers in contrast with the blue background are delicate and beautifully fit with the story.

Cover Design & Book Jacket: Matt Roeser

⟡ The Vanishing Stair by Maureen Johnson ⟡

When I received this book on release day, I just remember being awe-struck by the vibrant pinkish red of this book cover. The book spine of The Vanishing Stair is a continuation of the abstract pop-art-style book cover and replicates the hand-written-style of the title from the front cover. Johnson’s name in a bright sky blue which presents a fantastic contrast.

I feel like the recent trend toward bright colors and erratic lettering (thinking of John and Hank Green’s most recent books) has verged on being over-done. Having read both books of the Truly Devious series, I feel like there was a missed opportunity to create an intricately detailed book cover. But I do think that these books are great to go into blind, and the simple abstract design make the books visually appealing without giving anything of the story away.

Jacket Art: Leo Nickolls | Jacket Design: Katie Fitch

⟡ We, the Drowned by Cartsen Jensen ⟡

I feel no shame in admitting that I was entirely compelled to by this book because of it’s startlingly beautiful cover. The summary of the book seemed fascinating, but I am 100% certain that this book was purely an aesthetic purchase. The spine is a continuation of the sea illustrated in swift, powerful lines.

Cover Design: Suzanne Dean | Cover Illustration: Joe McLaren

I was a nice change of pace to think about why certain book spines are more appealing than others. I’m clearly a sucker for a delicate, intricate design. I’m interested in reading other people’s lists because I wonder what our choices might say about us. I also wonder how much research goes into book spine design, or if it’s less of a concern for publishers when it comes to marketing books. If you have any resources on this topic, feel free to drop links in the comments below?

Do you have any of these books on your shelves?

What are book spine elements you consider most appealing?

Thank you for reading!
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