Books on My Spring TBR | Top Ten Tuesday

The first official day of spring is tomorrow, March 20, 2019. In honor of the change of the season, I’m sharing the top ten books on my spring TBR! Spring is generally my least favorite of the seasons, but I am excited for it if it means a little more sunlight than we’ve currently been getting where I live. It’s so hard to take nice blog pics without natural sunlight!

In case you’re not familiar with Top Ten Tuesday, it is a weekly meme originally created by The Broke and the Bookish. Now it is run by Jana @ That Artsy Reader Girl who each week provides a bookish prompt and book bloggers share their top ten picks. These prompts are listed well in advance, so it’s easy to look ahead and decide which you think you can do. The themes don’t always work for me, so I’m happy when there’s one that fits in my schedule that I actually like!

Before I jump into the books on my spring TBR, I did have some notes I wanted to share about it. First, a lot of the books are ones that have carried over from my fall TBR. Reading has not been a huge priority, but I still want to read everything I wanted to read six months ago. Second, I’ll be moving in the next couple of months! So there’s a little more urgency to read the books on this list, if only so I can bare being separated from them for a time if need be.

I’m not exactly sure if I’ll be able to follow the books where they’re going. But more on that later!

If you find any of the books listed below fascinating I’ve included links to them on both Goodreads and Amazon. Just so you know, I am now an Amazon affiliate. If you do end up making a qualifying purchase through my one of my links I may make a small commission at no extra expense to you. ^_^

1 King of Scars

 King of Scars by Leigh Bardugo
Pages: Hardcover, 514 pages
Published: January 29, 2019 by Imprint
Genres: New Adult / Fantasy
Goodreads | Amazon

Face your demons…or feed them. The dashing young king, Nikolai Lantsov, has always had a gift for the impossible. No one knows what he endured in his country’s bloody civil war―and he intends to keep it that way. Now, as enemies gather at his weakened borders, Nikolai must find a way to refill Ravka’s coffers, forge new alliances, and stop a rising threat to the once-great Grisha Army.

Yet with every day a dark magic within him grows stronger, threatening to destroy all he has built. With the help of a young monk and a legendary Grisha general, Nikolai will journey to the places in Ravka where the deepest magic survives to vanquish the terrible legacy inside him. He will risk everything to save his country and himself. But some secrets aren’t meant to stay buried―and some wounds aren’t meant to heal.

I pre-ordered King of Scars about 10 months before it was due to come out, received it on release day in January, and have still yet to read it! A part of me is apprehensive it might disappoint. Another part of me is saying the longer I put it off, the less time I’ll have to wait for the next one. Regardless, I do expect to read this book soon. Maybe before any of the others on this list…But I’m not in the biggest mood for fantasy right now.

2 Akata Warrior

Akata Warrior by Nnedi Okorafor
Pages: Paperback, 512 pages
Published: October 16, 2018 by Speak
Genres: Young Adult / Fantasy
Goodreads | Amazon

A year ago, Sunny Nwazue, an American-born girl Nigerian girl, was inducted into the secret Leopard Society. As she began to develop her magical powers, Sunny learned that she had been chosen to lead a dangerous mission to avert an apocalypse, brought about by the terrifying masquerade, Ekwensu. Now, stronger, feistier, and a bit older, Sunny is studying with her mentor Sugar Cream and struggling to unlock the secrets in her strange Nsibidi book.

Eventually, Sunny knows she must confront her destiny. With the support of her Leopard Society friends, Orlu, Chichi, and Sasha, and of her spirit face, Anyanwu, she will travel through worlds both visible and invisible to the mysteries town of Osisi, where she will fight a climactic battle to save humanity.

Much-honored Nnedi Okorafor, winner of the Hugo, Nebula, and World Fantasy awards, merges today’s Nigeria with a unique world she creates. Akata Warrior blends mythology, fantasy, history and magic into a compelling tale that will keep readers spellbound.

 

Akata Witch was one of my most delightful discoveries last year and I ordered the sequel immediately afterward. Now nearly a year has gone by and I haven’t read it. Well, I haven’t lost interest! It’s just a matter of making the time for it…

3 The Promise

The Promise by Chaim Potok
Pages: Paperback, 368 pages
Published: October 3, 2011 by Anchor Books
Genres: Literary Fiction
Goodreads | Amazon

In a passionate, energetic narrative, The Promise brilliantly dramatizes what it is to master and use knowledge to make one’s own way in the world.

Reuven Malter lives in Brooklyn, he’s in love, and he’s studying to be a rabbi. He also keeps challenging the strict interpretations of his teachers, and if he keeps it up, his dream of becoming a rabbi may die.

One day, worried about a disturbed, unhappy boy named Michael, Reuven takes him sailing and cloud-watching. Reuven also introduces him to an old friend, Danny Saunders—now a psychologist with a growing reputation. Reconnected by their shared concern for Michael, Reuven and Danny each learns what it is to take on life—whether sacred truths or a troubled child—according to his own lights, not just established authority.

Every so often I’m in the mood for more adult literary fiction, and I’ve just been saving this one for such an occasion. I took this book on my spring break trip but didn’t manage to finish the book I had already started (Disrupt You by Jay Samit) so that I could move onto this one. It may be the next one I pick up, because I’m in a serious reading mood at the moment.

4 Strange the Dreamer

Strange the Dreamer by Laini Taylor
Pages: Paperback, 544 pages
Published: March 28, 2017 by Hodder & Stoughton
Genres: Young Adult / Fantasy
Goodreads | Amazon

From National Book Award finalist Laini Taylor comes an epic fantasy about a mythic lost city and its dark past.
 
The dream chooses the dreamer, not the other way around–and Lazlo Strange, war orphan and junior librarian, has always feared that his dream chose poorly. Since he was five years old, he’s been obsessed with the mythic lost city of Weep, but it would take someone bolder than he to cross half the world in search of it. Then a stunning opportunity presents itself, in the form of a hero called the Godslayer and a band of legendary warriors, and he has to seize his chance or lose his dream forever.
What happened in Weep two hundred years ago to cut it off from the rest of the world? And who is the blue-skinned goddess who appears in Lazlo’s dreams?
In this sweeping and breathtaking novel by National Book Award finalist Laini Taylor, author of the New York Times bestselling Daughter of Smoke & Bone trilogy, the shadow of the past is as real as the ghosts who haunt the citadel of murdered gods. Fall into a mythical world of dread and wonder, moths and nightmares, love and carnage.
The answers await in Weep.

Strange the Dreamer has been on almost every TBR I’ve made since I purchased it last summer. I’ve got nothing to say. I want to read it and see what all the fuss is about! I’ve also been waiting to be in an undeniable fantasy sort of mood.

5 The Blind Assassin

The Blind Assassin by Margaret Atwood
Pages: Paperback, 521 pages
Published: August 28, 2001 by Anchor
Genres: Literary Fiction
Goodreads | Amazon

From the #1 New York Times bestselling author of The Handmaid’s Tale

WINNER OF THE BOOKER PRIZE

In The Blind Assassin, Margaret Atwood weaves together strands of gothic suspense, romance, and science fiction into one utterly spellbinding narrative. The novel begins with the mysterious death—a possible suicide—of a young woman named Laura Chase in 1945. Decades later, Laura’s sister Iris recounts her memories of their childhood, and of the dramatic deaths that have punctuated their wealthy, eccentric family’s history. Intertwined with Iris’s account are chapters from the scandalous novel that made Laura famous, in which two illicit lovers amuse each other by spinning a tale of a blind killer on a distant planet. These richly layered stories-within-stories gradually illuminate the secrets that have long haunted the Chase family, coming together in a brilliant and astonishing final twist.

This was a somewhat random book purchase I made when I was first getting into book blogging in 2015. It wasn’t a popular book back then, but I felt like I needed some literary fiction and I had never read anything by Margaret Atwood. Still haven’t! Since it’s Women’s History Month, I’m kind of hoping I can get to this book in March, but there’s so many books…

6 Persuasion

Persuasion by Jane Austen
Pages: Paperback, 325 pages
Published: April 29, 2003 by Penguin Classics
Genres: Classic / English literature
Goodreads | Amazon

Jane Austen’s last completed novel, marrying witty social realism to a Cinderella love story

At twenty-­seven, Anne Elliot is no longer young and has few romantic prospects. Eight years earlier, she had been persuaded by her friend Lady Russell to break off her engagement to Frederick Wentworth, a handsome naval captain with neither fortune nor rank. What happens when they encounter each other again is movingly told in Jane Austen’s last completed novel. Set in the fashionable societies of Lyme Regis and Bath, Persuasion is a brilliant satire of vanity and pretension, but, above all, it is a love story tinged with the heartache of missed opportunities.

 

Most all of my Jane Austen books are in a thick leather-bound anthology I bought at Barnes & Noble as a teenager. I read one every couple of years or so, and have been eager to start Persuasion for the longest time. I had a Chinese friend in high school that raved about this book, and I think of her every time I see this book. I feel like it’s a great time to read more from this tome before it’s packed away.

7 Obsidio

Obsidio by Amie Kaufman and Jay Kristoff
Pages: Hardcover, 628 pages
Published: March 13, 2018 by Knopf Books for Young Readers
Genres: Young Adult / Science Fiction
Goodreads | Amazon

From bestselling author duo Amie Kaufman and Jay Kristoff comes the exciting finale in the trilogy that broke the mold and has been called “stylistically mesmerizing” and “out-of-this-world-awesome.”

Kady, Ezra, Hanna, and Nik narrowly escaped with their lives from the attacks on Heimdall station and now find themselves crammed with 2,000 refugees on the container ship, Mao. With the jump station destroyed and their resources scarce, the only option is to return to Kerenza–but who knows what they’ll find seven months after the invasion? Meanwhile, Kady’s cousin, Asha, survived the initial BeiTech assault and has joined Kerenza’s ragtag underground resistance. When Rhys–an old flame from Asha’s past–reappears on Kerenza, the two find themselves on opposite sides of the conflict. With time running out, a final battle will be waged on land and in space, heros will fall, and hearts will be broken.

This is another of those books I pre-ordered and then just never got around to when they were finally released. I feel like I would like to reread the first two books in the Illuminae Files trilogy before I read the finale, just to heighten the experience as I don’t know when I ever might reread these books truthfully.

8 Kingdom of Ash

 Kingdom of Ash by Sarah J. Maas
Pages: Hardcover, 984 pages
Published: October 23, 2018 by Bloomsbury YA
Genres: New Adult / Fantasy
Goodreads | Amazon

Years in the making, Sarah J. Maas’s #1 New York Times bestselling Throne of Glass series draws to an epic, unforgettable conclusion. Aelin Galathynius’s journey from slave to king’s assassin to the queen of a once-great kingdom reaches its heart-rending finale as war erupts across her world. . .

Aelin has risked everything to save her people-but at a tremendous cost. Locked within an iron coffin by the Queen of the Fae, Aelin must draw upon her fiery will as she endures months of torture. Aware that yielding to Maeve will doom those she loves keeps her from breaking, though her resolve begins to unravel with each passing day…

With Aelin captured, Aedion and Lysandra remain the last line of defense to protect Terrasen from utter destruction. Yet they soon realize that the many allies they’ve gathered to battle Erawan’s hordes might not be enough to save them. Scattered across the continent and racing against time, Chaol, Manon, and Dorian are forced to forge their own paths to meet their fates. Hanging in the balance is any hope of salvation-and a better world.

And across the sea, his companions unwavering beside him, Rowan hunts to find his captured wife and queen-before she is lost to him forever.

As the threads of fate weave together at last, all must fight, if they are to have a chance at a future. Some bonds will grow even deeper, while others will be severed forever in the explosive final chapter of the Throne of Glass series.

This book is only a priority because I’m tired of DNF-ing books with the plan of returning to them again. I’m reading this book on my iPhone as an eBook, so it’s one I could literally pick up whenever, but it’s so hard to get back into this world and story with all the characters and perspectives. I feel like I’ll just need to binge it one day and hope everything from past books comes back to me.

9 Status Update

Status Update by Alice E. Marwick
Pages: Paperback, 368 pages
Published: January 13th 2015 by Yale University Press
Genres: Non-Fiction / Academic Research

Goodreads | Amazon

Social media technologies such as YouTube, Twitter, and Facebook promised a new participatory online culture. Yet, technology insider Alice Marwick contends in this insightful book, “Web 2.0” only encouraged a preoccupation with status and attention. Her original research—which includes conversations with entrepreneurs, Internet celebrities, and Silicon Valley journalists—explores the culture and ideology of San Francisco’s tech community in the period between the dot com boom and the App store, when the city was the world’s center of social media development.
Marwick argues that early revolutionary goals have failed to materialize: while many continue to view social media as democratic, these technologies instead turn users into marketers and self-promoters, and leave technology companies poised to violate privacy and to prioritize profits over participation. Marwick analyzes status-building techniques—such as self-branding, micro-celebrity, and life-streaming—to show that Web 2.0 did not provide a cultural revolution, but only furthered inequality and reinforced traditional social stratification, demarcated by race, class, and gender.

I aim to read non-fiction every so often, and this book is one that I feel is a good one to read right now. I’m using social media more than ever for my blog and I want to see what can be learned from Marwick’s research.

10 Yes Please

 Yes Please by Amy Poehler
Pages: Paperback, 329 pages
Published: October 2015 by Dey Street Books
Genres: Non-Fiction / Biography / Humor
Goodreads | Amazon

Do you want to get to know the woman we first came to love on Comedy Central’s Upright Citizens Brigade? Do you want to spend some time with the lady who made you howl with laughter on Saturday Night Live, and in movies like Baby MamaBlades of Glory, and They Came Together? Do you find yourself daydreaming about hanging out with the actor behind the brilliant Leslie Knope on Parks and Recreation? Did you wish you were in the audience at the last two Golden Globes ceremonies, so you could bask in the hilarity of Amy’s one-liners?

If your answer to these questions is “Yes Please!” then you are in luck. In her first book, one of our most beloved funny folk delivers a smart, pointed, and ultimately inspirational read. Full of the comedic skill that makes us all love Amy, Yes Please is a rich and varied collection of stories, lists, poetry (Plastic Surgery Haiku, to be specific), photographs, mantras and advice. With chapters like “Treat Your Career Like a Bad Boyfriend,” “Plain Girl Versus the Demon” and “The Robots Will Kill Us All” Yes Please will make you think as much as it will make you laugh. Honest, personal, real, and righteous, Yes Please is full of words to live by.

Once again Yes Please ends one of my book lists. Last week it was a book I recommended for Leslie Knope fans. This week I’m saying I want to read it this spring because I remember loving it and would like to read it before it needs to be packed. I think it will be inspiring at a time when I need it to be right now.

Sorry if this is a boring list! I know a lot of these books have been on TBRs of months past. I think part of the reason I’ve not been so quick to pick them up is I don’t have many more books like them to read. My book purchasing has slowed down in the interest of saving money and with awareness of my uncertain future in mind, I’ve not been eager to add to my book collection. I don’t feel like I have the biggest book collection – especially compared to my bookish peers – but I do anticipate having a lot of trouble moving what I do have.

Thank you for reading!
Follow my blog via Bloglovin’. Also find me on Twitter and Instagram.

18 thoughts on “Books on My Spring TBR | Top Ten Tuesday

  1. Once Upon A Bookshelf

    There are some great titles on this list. Looks like I have to add more to mine! LOL I hope you like Kingdom of Ash. I am actually very late in reading the Throne of Glass series. Now that all the books are out I am making it a priority to finish by this year (or hopefully within a few months since they are so addicting hehe) I am currently on book 3 and I am loving it so far. Have you enjoyed reading this series?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Lori @ The Inky Saga

      Wow! Book 3 is when the series really got good for me. I’ve got a love-hate relationship with Sarah J. Maas’ works, but I would still check out anything she writes. I think it would be really fun to read this series in a marathon, but I don’t think I could justify rereading these books when they are so big.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Once Upon A Bookshelf

        Oh yah I feel the same way about Book 3! The series seems a lot more interesting for me now with the intro of new characters and Celaena’s character growth. OMG its just done so beautifully! Oh yah I completely understand you! The books are pretty long to do a reread! lol Maybe you can try watching come booktube recaps or blog reviews? hehe thank you for your thoughts! :)

        Like

  2. Pingback: The Emoji Challenge – Siobhan's Novelties

  3. Pingback: Notes on the Last Few Weeks – The Inky Saga

  4. Pingback: What I Read This Spring – The Inky Saga

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.