Lessons Learned in January + February BuJo Spread

Hello, everyone! I meant for this post to come out last week, but, in truth, I didn’t start my February bullet journal until last weekend. So I’m a little late, but that’s fine. I’m a prime example of the fact that you do not have to skip a month just because you start late!

Before I get into everything, I do want to admit that I abandoned my January bujo at some point halfway through. January felt like the longest month ever, and I came to dread the need to sketch out and use the weekly spreads. Additionally, I realized that some elements of the traditional bujo spread just weren’t working for me. January was a real learning experience and I went into February’s spread with some adjustments in mind.

Keep reading for the lessons I learned as well as a glimpse of my February spread!

❝ Keep it simple

I really want to keep a bullet journal year round, and the only way I figured I would be able to do that is to keep things simple. I realized that the design I chose for January, while beautiful, was a bit too much to keep up with when it came to the weekly spreads. I should’ve just dropped the design and kept kept up with the journalling, but I wanted the entire month to be cohesive visually.

So for February, I chose a much simpler theme and design that didn’t require so much time, that way I can focus on what really matters: the content.

❝ Sketch out the weekly spreads in advance ❞

My least favorite aspect of the bujo has always been the weekly spread. I’ve seen many different versions of it that I just do not find personally fitting for what I need. I hate seeing empty space on the page, and some days I just don’t find that I’ve done much at all. Plus, I don’t want to keep too much personal info in my bullet journal, so using it partially as a diary to fill it up is not really an option for me.

What I do need in my bujo is space to keep my daily to-do lists, so I decided to figure out this month how to make the weekly spreads work for me. I decided to sketch them out at the beginning of the month, instead of on the weekends, so that they are ready to go on weeks that I didn’t have the time or will work on them the weekend before.

As I did this, I also realized that I could actually utilize extra space for notes that will help remind me about the day in addition to the to-do lists and keep weekly habit trackers for the main activities I’m prioritizing that week. I decided to start keeping notes of the German vocabulary I am working on that week.

At this point, I actually only have two weeks planned out, so I will still need to figure out the last two weeks of February. I plan to go even more simplistic, using a more minimalist approach inspired by Instagram bullet journalist @journal.it. Below are some ideas I have in mind.

❝ If you aren’t using a spread, don’t continue to include it ❞

As much as I love the idea of mood trackers and individual habit trackers, I don’t actually find them all that practical or useful. My habit trackers specifically began to give me a little bit of anxiety because there were few days I could do everything I listed. I felt like a failure, even though I was doing a lot in reality.

So I don’t have a month-long habit tracker element in my February spread. But as I mentioned above, I did start naturally including trackers for things I wanted to keep track of during the week, specifically exercise. Ideally I would exercise everyday, but some days I need a break to accommodate other things on my agenda or to make sure I have some time for fun. My realistic (but still ambitious) goal is five days a week. The tracker reminds me if I’ve fallen behind.

 ⟡  February BuJo Spread  ⟡ 

For February, I decided to go with a lightbulb theme that I saw on Instagram last month designed by the bullet journalist @bulletwithe. I thought her style was really cute and whimsical. It is also fairly simplistic and one I felt I could easily duplicate and make my own.

This month I decided to start my monthly spread on the left side of my open journal so that I could see my monthly log beside it. Another difference from last month is how I put the day and date in the middle of my monthly log page instead on the far left. I think it was a simple way to make the page more interesting, although I could still see myself moving it around in the future.

Before my weekly spreads start, I only have two pages for monthly notes, which consists of space for brain dump (random ideas/notes I have during the month), my monthly goals, my blog growth tracker for WordPress and YouTube (if I do indeed start it up again), books I read, and a writing graph!

I will not show my weekly spread today in this post, because I have already begun filling it in for this week and would rather do a proper flip-through at the end of the month. If you like what you see so far and want to know what direction I took for the weekly spreads, I highly recommend checking out @bulletwithe‘s Instagram page for how she decided to do them. My first week is her Week 3 and my second one (currently still a work in progress) is a variation on her Week 4 I think (she didn’t label it).

I have some ideas for future bujo-related blog posts that I’m hoping to start working on this weekend. I’ve really falling down the Instagram bujo community rabbit hole, so I feel like I have discovered a lot more possibilities and things I would like to try. I’ve also already begun brainstorming themes for March so that I can hit the ground running next month and hopefully make it easier for any of you who might be interested in joining me!

Tomorrow I will finally be sharing my thoughts on The Man in the High Castle! I finished writing it on Monday and just need to give it a final polish before I send it out into the universe.

Thank you for reading!
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3 thoughts on “Lessons Learned in January + February BuJo Spread

  1. Pingback: February’s Inky Notes – The Inky Saga

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